This Slow Cooker Stuffing Recipe Will Make Cooking For The Holidays So Much Easier









Food & Recipes

If stuffing isn’t already your favorite holiday side dish, it’s about to be!





Preparing for Thanksgiving dinner requires a lot of prep work so, obviously, we welcome any shortcuts that make cooking for the big day easier. So when you see this recipe — which makes prepping easier without sacrificing taste — you’ll want to make it a staple in your kitchen. Ready for the big reveal? Behold this slow cooker stuffing recipe.

The Crock-Pot Stuffing recipe that will save you some major time in the kitchen this season comes from the Spend With Pennies website. It’s great because it’s homemade — which beats stuffing from the box — but only requires minimal effort.

All you need to create this amazing dish is bread, chicken broth, eggs, celery, onion and spices. The Spend With Pennies website also walks you through the best types of bread for making stuffing and how to dry it out on your own.





The recipe does require some minimal effort before you add it all to the crockpot. You’ve got to season and saute the onions and celery and then mix it all together. But as you can see in this video from the Spend With Pennies YouTube channel, it’s all very easy to get to that final slow cooker step:

Once you’ve got the ingredients combined, you throw them in the crockpot and let them slow cook for four hours. They’ll be ready to be served immediately, or can even be made 24 hours in advance to get one step out of the way before Turkey Day. How amazing is that?

When the stuffing’s all warmed and ready, it’ll look a little something like this:

Spend With Pennies

Yum!

Speaking of Thanksgiving, here’s something to be thankful for. This stuffing recipe isn’t the only slow-cooked version of classic sides that can be served up for the holiday.





For instance, Gimme Some Oven has a recipe for slow-cooked cranberry sauce that will make your Thanksgiving preparations all the easier. Orange juice, water, sugar, cranberries and some time in the crockpot will yield a delicious turkey topping:

Gimme Some Oven

This recipe from Dinner Then Dessert will walk you through the steps to yield perfectly delicious macaroni and cheese that takes little to no effort to make:

Dinner Then Dessert

And mashed potatoes — a dish that can be a labor of love thanks to all the peeling, boiling and mashing — can have almost all of the work taken out of them thanks to hours spend slow cooking. This recipe from Cooking Classy shows you how to create creamy garlic mashed potatoes right in your crockpot:

Cooking Classy

Who’s ready to keep the actual hands-on cooking at a minimum and opt for these time-saving recipes this Thanksgiving?

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7 Mistakes People Make When Cooking Stuffing—and How To Avoid Them









Food & Recipes

Here’s how to avoid them.





Stuffing is a classic Thanksgiving side dish that’s a must for any holiday spread. You can take this comfort food staple in many directions, and while it can be argued that there’s no “wrong” way to make stuffing, there are some common missteps that can leave you a little underwhelmed with the results.

Here are seven mistakes people often make when preparing stuffing and how you can avoid them, guaranteeing you’ll make the perfect dish with which to wow your guests this Thanksgiving.

1. Not Drying Out The Bread

Starting your stuffing out with bread that’s completely dry is essential for your stuffing’s taste and texture. A lot of recipes recommend using stale bread for this reason, but you can actually oven-dry your bread for the same effect in a lot less time. Serious Eats recommends toasting a white sandwich-style loaf at 275 degrees for about 45 minutes.





white bread photo
Getty Images | Dan Kitwood

2. Actually Stuffing The Bird

It’s called stuffing because you’re supposed to stuff the turkey with it, right? While that may be where the term comes from, it also makes it a lot more difficult to properly cook the turkey. Instead, just serve it on the side.

“So I always do it in buttered baked dishes and cover it with foil for most of the cooking … usually about 30 to 40 minutes until it’s warm, and then take off the foil so the top can crisp up, and it’s absolutely delicious,” Jack Bishop, editorial director of “America’s Test Kitchen,” told NPR of his method for making perfect stuffing.

stuffing photo
Flickr | NEPMET

3. Not Cooking Your Vegetables

There’s more to stuff besides bread. To really maximize the flavor of your stuffing, you should add aromatic vegetables like onions and celery. But don’t just add them in their raw state. Make sure to cook them in a bit of butter first.

cook onions photo
Getty Images | Justin Sullivan

4. Soggy Stuffing

If you end up with soggy stuffing despite your best efforts, it may come down to your cooking method. A good way to end up with crispy stuffing every time is to turn your stuffing into muffins. Check out this recipe for make-ahead stuffing muffins from Chew Out Loud.

Chew Out Loud

5. Not Using Enough Butter

While cutting down on fat and calorie-laden ingredients like butter may seem like a great way to lighten up a recipe, when it comes to stuffing, skimping on butter may spell disaster. Using plenty of butter is the key to moist, yet crispy stuffing. Your diet can start on Friday.





Adobe

6. Overcooking It

Perfect stuffing needs to be cooked just right. Overcook it and your stuffing will be dry. Undercook it and it will be soggy. It can be difficult to get it just right, so if you’re bringing stuffing as part of a potluck, undercook it slightly at home so that when you arrive at your destination, you can finish it in the oven in just a few minutes.

thanksgiving stuffing photo
Flickr | danxoneil

7. Adding The Stock All At Once

If you haven’t learned this already, the key to perfect stuffing is a delicate balance. Adding the right amount of stock to the stuffing is essential to getting an ideal texture, but so is how and when you add it. Add about a half cup to a cup at a time to give the bread time to soak up the broth before you add more.

chicken stock photo
Getty Images | Monica Schipper

Time to get cooking!

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